Q2

#60 - I am looking to make a routine of 4 days bowling and 3 days of gym. Is 4 days of bowling a week enough?

QUESTION

I am looking to make a routine of 4 days bowling and 3 days of gym. Is 4 days of bowling a week enough?


ANSWER

Hey,

It’s great to see that you’re so committed and willing to put the hard yards in. There is, however, a fine line between doing enough and doing too much. You’re planning on training 7 days a week – when will you rest?

Rest is a very important part of an athletes’ development. Without rest, your body, nervous system and mind cannot recover!

In an interview we conducted with Tino Best, he touched on how you can structure your training plan, here’s a quote from the interview:

“You don’t have to go in the gym and lift weights you know. You can set your programme for like, the next 6 weeks, 5 days a week I’m going to run on the treadmill for 25 minutes. For the next 6 weeks, I’m doing powerlifting and sprints”.

I would say that you should look to periodise your training. Have a clear goal for blocks of 4-6 weeks and train hard but smart during those blocks. The exact goal of those blocks depends on what areas you’re looking to improve on.

With the bowling, it’s great to want to bowl a lot but don’t try and go flat out in every session. Manage your body and your workloads to avoid injury. Implement periodisation in your bowling sessions as well. Split session up between technical, tactical, critical thinking and skills etc.

Your attitude is great. Keep it up but do not overdo it and burn yourself out! Rest and recover and make sure you’re ready to go for every session!

I hope that helps.

All the best.


Do you want to know how the professionals bowl fast? Listen to our podcasts with international and domestic fast bowlers, technical coaches and fitness trainers.

#59 - How many sprints can we do in a day and how many rounds of the ground is enough?

QUESTION

How many sprints can we do in a day and how many rounds of the ground is enough?


ANSWER

Hey,

Great question. As young, ambitious athletes, we want to do more and more but you must remember that quality of training is far more important than quantity.

Sprints are a very high intensity activity and therefore taxes your CNS (central nervous system) quite heavily. You must be fresh and well rested before a sprint session otherwise you will not get the desired stimulus that you are looking for. In fact, if you try and do high intensity exercise when your nervous system is flat – you risk doing more harm than good.

Remember, you’re looking for quality – 6 high-quality sprints are far better than 20 average sprints. It’s hard to say how many you should be doing – the best thing I can say here is to focus on quality. If you’re feeling flat or fatigued.. STOP!

It’s also important to remember that you must take long rest between sprints, your body needs time to replenish ATP. There is NO point trying to do sprint work when you’re shattered!

When you say “rounds of the ground”, I guess you’re talking about endurance running. Again, quality of training is very important. Never train speed and endurance on the same day – it’s counter-productive!

Without knowing what your base endurance threshold is, I can’t really comment on how many rounds are sufficient for you. What I will say is that there are many different types of running drills that you can do such as rounds of the grounds, interval shuttles between cones or curved running.

Remember to always build up your loads incrementally; don’t run before you can walk.

We spoke to Middlesex fast bowler, Tom Barber, about endurance running and he mentioned a great running drill that he’s been doing:

1. Set up 2 cones 20 metres apart

2. Run from one cone to the other – you have 7 seconds to get there

3. Jog back to the starting cone

4. Repeat 6 times (1 over)

5. Rest and do another set of 6 reps

Tom told us that in-season, he would do about 4 sets of 6 to keep on top of his running loads.Please look out for that podcast coming out in a few weeks.

I hope that helps.

All the best.


Do you want to know how the professionals bowl fast? Listen to our podcasts with international and domestic fast bowlers, technical coaches and fitness trainers.

#58 - Is pace natural or can you increase it by working on it?

QUESTION

Is pace natural or can you increase it by working on it?


ANSWER

Hey,

Really good question.

There are so many different opinions on pace. Opinions can be debated, but facts can’t.

Chris Woakes came into the game bowling mid to high 70’s, he then went on to bowl around mid to high 80’s – which I would say is a pretty significant increase in speed!

Jofra Archer is another example. He was bowling in the 80’s when he debuted for Sussex and recently he’s been hitting the 150kph mark!

Imran Khan is another famous example – he was ridiculed for being ‘military medium’ – he then went away and came back as a genuine fast bowler.

So my honest answer to you is that I believe it is possible to increase your pace but it isn’t easy!

I hope that helps.

All the best.


Do you want to know how the professionals bowl fast? Listen to our podcasts with international and domestic fast bowlers, technical coaches and fitness trainers.

#57 - How does a fast bowler prepare before a match?

QUESTION

How does a fast bowler prepare before a match?


ANSWER

Hey,

This is a great question.

The first thing you want to make sure you do is wake up fresh and well rested – so get a good night’s sleep the night before.

On the morning of a match, it’s all about staying relaxed and focused on the game ahead. Tino Best told us that the most important thing before a game is knowing, “what you want to do”. So, assess the pitch and the conditions and have a clear game plan about how you’re going to bowl.

From a physical standpoint, you want to make sure that you arrive nice and early at the ground (30mins before your teammates) and warm up thoroughly. We’ve spoken to a lot of bowlers about rhythm and they’ve all said that rhythm is such an unpredictable part of fast bowling but what you can do to ‘improve’ your chances of performing is having a warm-up process that you follow before the game.

Australian speedster, Aaron Summers, has an extensive warm-up bowling routine which includes different weighted balls (please look out for that podcast in the future).

West Indian fast bowler, Tino Best, told us that he likes to make sure his glutes and hamstrings are well stretched so he can minimise the chances of a tight back.

So, my advice to you is to understand what process works best for you; whatever enables you to be firing from ball 1. All you then have to do is follow that process religiously before games. Remember, like all sports, you will have good days and bad days so don’t get too beat up if you have a bad day – it’s part of the game!

I hope that helps.

All the best.


Do you want to know how the professionals bowl fast? Listen to our podcasts with international and domestic fast bowlers, technical coaches and fitness trainers.

#56 - I’m doing weight training and conditioning but I’m not getting stronger, I’m not able to increase muscle mass – how can I?

QUESTION

I’m doing weight training and conditioning but I’m not getting stronger, I’m not able to increase muscle mass – how can I?


ANSWER

Hey,

It’s great to hear that you’re in the gym. Increasing muscle mass and strength isn’t as simple as getting in the gym and lifting weights. A lot of it depends on your weight, metabolism, fat-to-muscle ratio and training style.

Put simply, if you’re looking to increase muscle mass – then you need to be eating more food so that your body is in a calorie surplus. You should also look to implement ‘progressive overload’ with your training which will allow you to get stronger incrementally. The opposite is applied if you’re looking to lose weight – where you eat less so that your body is in a calorie deficit.

Be patient when evaluating your strength increases. It doesn’t happen overnight and it can take some time. Stay disciplined and consistent, monitor your calories and work hard.

If you have access to a personal trainer or strength coach – they can also help evaluate how many calories you need to be consuming to reach your goals.

I hope that helps.

All the best.


Do you want to know how the professionals bowl fast? Listen to our podcasts with international and domestic fast bowlers, technical coaches and fitness trainers.

#55 - Does your jump have a direct effect on bowling speed and follow through?

QUESTION

Does your jump have a direct effect on bowling speed and follow through?


ANSWER

Hey,

Of course it does. The jump is how your body transfers energy and momentum from your run up into your delivery stride and action. It’s a fundamental part of bowling technique; it varies from bowler to bowler – some bowlers need a high jump, some need a long jump and some hardly jump at all. The most important thing to consider with the jump is how you feel.

If the transition from take off to back foot landing in the crease is effortless, smooth and rhythmical, then chances are that you’re on the right track. If however, your transition from take off to back foot landing in the crease feels like a lot of effort or uncomfortable – then you may need to consider making some adjustments.

When we spoke to Tino Best, he mentioned that a high jump helped him generate power in the crease.

Your run up speed also has an impact on your jump; if you’re running in too fast, you may not have enough time to get up in the air. You tend to find bowlers like the great Malcolm Marshall literally run through the crease with little to no jump whereas someone like Shaun Tait would approach the crease in a more relaxed fashion to really get off the ground and get his body into position to bowl. It’s all very individualistic. My advice would be to make some adjustments and see how you feel.

The follow-through is merely a consequence of an explosive delivery. There will be times where your body clicks and travels through the crease and your follow through will be nice and long and then there will be times where your follow through is not as great. It all comes down to how you feel on the day and how you execute your technique.

I hope that helps.

All the best.


Do you want to know how the professionals bowl fast? Listen to our podcasts with international and domestic fast bowlers, technical coaches and fitness trainers.

#54 - I train 6 days a week and play a match on the 7th day. My pace is going down day by day, I don’t understand why?

QUESTION

I train 6 days a week and play a match on the 7th day. My pace is going down day by day, I don’t understand why?


ANSWER

Hey,

I’m so happy that you asked this question as I feel this is something a lot of young athletes misunderstand. It’s great that you’re keen and committed to giving your all to cricket. But you must remember that rest is as important as training.

Fast bowling is a nervous system activity. If you’re training every single day, you’re burning your nervous system out completely – there’s no chance that you’ll be fresh for your game on the 7th day.

This is called CNS Fatigue / Adrenal fatigue and it’s a very well documented topic in sports science – I’d recommend you to do some research on these topics.

You need to incorporate rest into your training. There’s a time to go all in and there’s a time to take it easy. A lot of the bowlers that we’ve spoken to have said that they like to have a full day of rest before a game to ensure their bodies are fully energised and fresh for the game.

I hope that helps.

All the best.


Do you want to know how the professionals bowl fast? Listen to our podcasts with international and domestic fast bowlers, technical coaches and fitness trainers.

#53 - When I follow through, I lose balance – how can I improve this?

QUESTION

When I follow through, I lose balance – how can I improve this?


ANSWER

Hey,

This is an interesting question. I’ve found that when you drive out of the crease explosively, you tend to lose balance.

This isn’t a bad thing?

It’s common to see bowlers losing their balance in their follow through. It’s just a catch of catching your body in time when you’re following through. Perhaps you need to get used to it or try and slow down your approach to the crease to limit the amount of energy you’re producing.

I hope that helps.

All the best.


Do you want to know how the professionals bowl fast? Listen to our podcasts with international and domestic fast bowlers, technical coaches and fitness trainers.